Submissions

Alice's Adventures Under Ground [in Wonderland]: 'Alice drinks to grow taller' (British Library, 1862-64)
Alice’s Adventures Under Ground [in Wonderland]: ‘Alice drinks to grow taller’ (British Library, 1862-64)
The GLCA Consortium for Teaching and Learning encourages essays, advice and research from GLCA faculty and staff in a variety of forms, as noted below. All submissions should be sent to:

Steven Volk

Gregory Wegner

Article of the Week: The Article of the Week is a short (1000-1500 words), advice-driven essay that seeks to provide readers with concrete suggestions on how to address particular issues or challenges that arise in teaching (e.g. leading discussion sections, active lecturing, preparing assignments, etc.). Occasionally, this section will also publish essays on the state of the profession, liberal arts education, or issues that have attracted particular media attention (e.g. “safe” spaces, trigger warnings, vocational courses, etc.). Submissions will be reviewed by the CTL’s co-directors. 

Essays for Action: Longer (3000-6000 word), peer-reviewed research-based articles centered on the scholarship of teaching and learning and of particular relevance for GLCA member colleges (e.g. smaller, residential, liberal arts colleges). We welcome research articles, case studies, and, where appropriate, longer reflective essays. Research can be focused on qualitative as well as quantitative methodologies. Submissions will be reviewed by the CTL’s co-directors and sent for review to two additional editors within the GLCA community.

Research Annotations: Short (200-400 word) summaries of key articles, books, and other resources for the scholarship of teaching and learning. The target audience are faculty who are short of time and looking for a few resources to introduce them to a topic they want to explore further but lack the time to do a complete literature review. Submissions will be reviewed by one of the CTL’s co-directors.

Try This – Innovative Ideas in Pedagogy: 700-1200 word essays usually based on research action projects which faculty members carry out in their own classes. Essays should suggest innovations in research backed up by experimentation carried out in classes. The data can be quatitative (e.g. improvements in exam scores as compared to existing methods) or qualitative (assessing the affective impact of innovations which have an impact on class dynamics as experienced by the instructor).  Submissions will be reviewed by one of the CTL’s co-directors.