ESSAY FOR ACTION: Teaching Excellence, Errors of Ineptitude, and the Triple Bottom Line (Nate Eastman, Earlham)

Nate Eastman,  Associate Professor of English, Earlham College May 1, 2017 Introduction In his 2003 Lancet article “Errors: Incompetence, Ineptitude or Failure” Lionel Opie writes that “errors are of most interest when they reflect overt incompetence or ineptitude […] or failure to do what should have been done.”[1]  This is… Read More

Peter Rutkoff: Creating a Democratic Classroom: Project-Based Learning, Dewey, and Other Pedagogical Oddities in the Liberal Arts

Peter Rutkoff, Professor of American Studies, Kenyon College (with occasional commentary by students in italics) PART I It took more than forty years, but this time I found my way to shape a classroom culture that balanced progressive theory and practice. It simply felt right. I’d been talking about a… Read More

Patrik Hultberg: Instructional Design and Cognitive Load Theory

Patrik Hultberg, Coordinator of Educational Effectiveness, Associate Professor of Economics, Economics and Business, Kalamazoo College April 3, 2017: November 6, 2017 Addition:  You can access Prof. Hultberg’s video on Cognitive Load Theory here. All teachers want their students to learn. Although there are many different definitions of learning, most would… Read More

Finding our Voice in a “Post-Truth” Era

Steven Volk, Director, Center for Teaching Innovation and Excellence (Oberlin College), Co-Director GLCA Consortium for Teaching and Learning December 12, 2016 Where to begin?   Why not with a definition of “post-truth” from the Oxford dictionary: “Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping… Read More